Diego Berjon

DIEGO BERJON

diego-berjon-bio-picDiego Berjon is a Mexican artist based in Barcelona, Spain. He graduated in Graphic Design from Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, and completed his undergraduate studies at the University of San Francisco, California. He holds a Masters degree in Art Direction and Communication Strategies from Elisava School of Design in Barcelona.

Diego’s work is consistent in the search for aesthetics through the understanding of composition and the use of black. His work, primarily in black, sometimes intentionally blurs the boundaries between written language and image. Other times it explores the relation of positive and negative space or, ultimately, going back to one of the basic elements in visual construction: the line.

About Diego’s collaboration with Kate Banazi

Explains Diego: “Kate and I started this collaboration project in 2014. We found each other on Instagram and from day one we loved each other’s work. There’s always been mutual respect and also a common appreciation for abstraction and composition but, most importantly, I think we noticed the fact that we work in completely different ways (from technique, to process, to palette, etc) and we were curious about finding out how our styles would clash.

“We send each other a bunch of ‘unfinished’ pieces by mail and we do it without ever knowing what’s going to come out of the package. For us collaborating has a lot to do with the unexpected and also with challenging the other person. In our case the challenge is about composition. You could say each artwork is like a little test and, when you get a new piece, you need to come up with a ‘visual solution’ and finish the piece.

“Speaking from my side, my only restriction is to send Kate stuff that she can work over with her silkscreen printing. I know that’s her thing so I always keep in mind that my paint shouldn’t be too thick and the surface should be as flat as possible but, apart from that, I just improvise. I try to create well-defined compositions (and leave well-defined spaces) on the go and do it in a style that could make a nice contrast with Kate’s work.”